Nissan Frontier 2022 review: Finally keeping up with the neighbors

Nissan Frontier 2022 review: Finally keeping up with the neighbors

The third generation Nissan Frontier is the first to be made for customers in the United States, and it shows. Nissan previewed the new truck’s powertrain on the outgoing model—which was too old to be competitive—and now we’re finally getting a full fat upgrade with all the bells and whistles. It was worth the wait.
1. More impressive inside and out
2. Better tech
Nissan has never really led the way with its cabin technology, but in the ever-obsolete field of midsize trucks, the 2022 Frontier is making itself a competitive case. My tester powers the optional 9-inch touchscreen that powers Nissan’s traditional infotainment system, which offers the usual things: Wi-Fi hotspot, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. The inline navigation has a somewhat outdated looking map, but the entire shebang is adequately responsive and easy to use with minimal distraction. Charging comes via USB-A and USB-C ports, but there’s a wireless device charger between the gearbox and armrest if you’d prefer to ditch the wires.
3. Solid on-road demeanor
To say the 2022 Nissan Frontier looks better than its predecessor on the road is an understatement. Frontier drives more comfortably than in years past; It’s no longer annoying as a traveler. Upgraded suspension components definitely play a role, with the cabin experiencing less body-to-frame struggle over unwanted patches of pavement. The steering can be a little heavy at lower speeds, but not so much that it’s difficult to maneuver in the parking lot. The fully hydraulic rack also means lane-keeping assist isn’t offered, which is one of the trade-offs for keeping it old-school.
4. Down to brass tacks
The 2022 Nissan Frontier may be the latest body-on-frame pickup in the midsize segment, but the Honda Ridgeline is new, too, and its monocoque body makes it more suitable for everyday use than conventional pickups without sacrificing its bulk. The Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon are nearly a decade old and feel the same inside and out, although specialist trims like the ZR2 try to keep things interesting. The Ford Ranger will soon be replaced with a design that wasn’t several years old when it arrived in the States, although it’s an excellent truck underneath. And Toyota Tacoma soldiers work like a post-apocalyptic cockroach with some deliberate quality-of-life improvements every two years.